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Leader’s dilemmas: How to turn Rock Stars into Super Stars…or let them go

Leader’s dilemmas: How to turn Rock Stars into Super Stars…or let them go

by Ashley Prisant Lesko, Business Executive

Leader’s dilemmas: How to turn Rock Stars into Super Stars – or “promote” them to customer

Summary: It takes a STRONG leader to fix a Rock Star on their team, however those leaders that do find their teams are stronger – and their employees respect the level of accountability the leader has proven to hold every person on the team.

It’s now 2019, the last year in this decade. We’ve seen some tumultuous times, and leaders of all kinds have been challenged in many ways.

What is a leader? A leader is simply one that aims to influence another person’s behavior or actions. You don’t have to have a title to be a leader. Anyone that chooses can become one

I have worked in several companies, and all of them had their share of Rock Stars and Super Stars. As a leader, you want to get away from the Rock Stars as quickly as possible and hope that you can have several Super Stars in your midst.

Super Stars are the ultimate team players. They lead from the sidelines, from the center and anywhere they are needed. Their primary goal is to do what’s best for the company, but they won’t lose what personally motivates them (such as outside of work) to do it. If taken care of, Super Stars are the most loyal employees; they know their job as well the job of several others. They have significant knowledge on their organization, their work to the point that makes their organization more successful by doing their job or feel the pain if they do not. However, even though most Super Stars know how important they are to their organization – they never use it against the company.

Rock Stars, on the other hand, can be team leaders, but many times chose the easier (and more self-serving) path of taking care of #1 – themselves. Like Super Stars, they have significant knowledge on their organization. They know their knowledge is vital – and use it to their advantage as much as possible. This could be in the form of attitude, work load (choosing to work less), or demands (pay raise, position, perks) beyond normal expectations.

The challenge for companies with Rock Stars is that typically, Rock Stars are made, not born. The company has allowed these individuals to grown in the organization as a single point of failure – someone who is more important to the organization – than the organization is to the Rock Star. The organization needs the individual – more than the individual needs the organization. This could even appear to the point of blackmail (“if you don’t give into my demands (as a Rock Star), then I will leave the company, and you will lose XYZ information”) if not kept in check.

How do you prevent growing Rock Stars?

1- Take a look at your team for Single Points of Failure. Is there anyone on your team that is the only person that has knowledge of an area?

2- If so, build a plan for a backup, develop a playbook, create a training plan, set up a bench of individuals that can grow in the job

3- If you find that the Rock Star recognizes their position may be threatened (“knowledge is power! If I have all the knowledge, then I have power”), explain your plan going forward to have backups – to help them and everyone else. Encourage them to become Super Stars – becoming team players in the process. If the Rock Star continues to challenge you – you may be forced to hold them accountable – either they train others, or they have to leave your organization

Some may challenge the advice in #3 – and rightly so. If you get rid of the Rock Star, don’t you lose the knowledge? Digging a bit deeper, you’ll find that most Rock Stars are seen by their peers as a poison pill that gets away with things that others don’t – and unjustly so. By keeping a Rock Star, and allowing him/her to continue – you put your organization at risk with their singular knowledge and your team as a breakdown in teamwork can occur.

I find many leaders struggle the most with the last paragraph – and I have found myself in that category. It does take a strong leader to upgrade a Rock Star into a Super Star on their team, but it can be done.

Leaders that go beyond and hold their Rock Stars (and teams) accountable find their teams are stronger.

It’s 2019. This is the year YOU can make it happen.

Originally published on LinkedIn

Go Beyond the Job Description, Book By Ashley Prisant Lesko

Go Beyond the Job Description, Book By Ashley Prisant Lesko

Go Beyond the Job Description, Ashley Prisant Lesko. new book published July 03 2018
Go Beyond the Job Description, Ashley Prisant Lesko. new book published July 03 2018

What do you do well that you don’t use at work? In Go Beyond the Job Description, HR professionals and general managers will learn how to increase individual and team contributions by using what they already know and demonstrates in step-by-step style how to increase productivity, motivation, and engagement in individuals with a proven 100-day project called Talent Engagement Optimization (TEO).

TEO is using more of what people already have, but are not using, in their jobs. It looks beyond the day-to-day tasks and responsibilities and considers in depth the employee talents, opportunities, and development now and in the future, and incorporates them in practical and meaningful ways that benefits employee and organization. Features include an online assessment to learn your own Talent Engagement Zone, a Development Plan, Strategic Program Transition Plan, and Additional Resources and Tools. A methodical and insightful book with detailed guidelines for any HR manager looking to optimize employee talent and build sustainable engagement, especially those with limited time and funds.

Available for purchase from Amazon

The Team: Long Biographies

The Team: Long Biographies


Ashley Prisant Lesko, President
Ashley Prisant Lesko, President

Zoe Mercurio, Program Manager
Zoe Mercurio, Program Manager


Masheka Awari, That Wellness Girl
Masheka Awari, That Wellness Girl


Alena Casey, Community Engagement, Technology
Alena Casey, Community Engagement, Technology


Michael Lozano, Doctor of Education, Masters in Management
Michael Lozano, Doctor of Education, Masters in Management


Marvin F.L.. Hansen, Msc, PgDip, Bsc.
Marvin F.L.. Hansen, Msc, PgDip, Bsc.


Monica Anderson Young, Munich Re IT Business Solutions Chief-of-Staff, Consultant
Monica Anderson Young, Munich Re IT Business Solutions Chief-of-Staff, Consultant


Shannon Watson, Cross-cultural management, North America and Asia, consultant
Shannon Watson, Cross-cultural management, North America and Asia, consultant

Ashley Prisant Lesko, President
Ashley Prisant Lesko, President

Dr. Ashley Prisant Lesko, SHRM-CP has a multi-faceted background – from working in the military as a Naval Officer to leadership roles in Fortune 100 companies, to educating students at colleges and universities. As a Surface Warfare Officer, she led hundreds of sailors and employees on ships around the world.

After receiving her MBA at MIT, she filled various senior leadership roles at Amazon, working in operations, HR and finance with over $45M in P&L, training programs, budgeting, and strategy across 4 fulfillment centers.

Her book, Go Beyond the Job Description, sheds light on ways for leaders and individuals who want to do more of what they enjoy doing in their current job. She now leads Square Peg Solutions, focused in operations strategy implementation for high growth companies & optimizing leaders’ impact on organizations. She teaches leadership, business and HR classes for Harvard Extension.

  • Name one thing most people don’t know about you.
    I have a passion for travel – I have been to over 45 countries, all 50 states, and all 7 continents. I believe the more you travel, the more you learn about yourself and those around you.

  • What is your greatest leadership trait?
    The ability to see the opportunity in others. Everyone has a potential – but it’s up to the individual to act on that potential. I help people recognize and act on that potential – and love seeing what they become when they cross those milestones! This is one of the inspirations of Leadership 9 Box – it helps leaders fill in the gaps of their skills (believe me, we all have them!)

  • What is your favorite leadership motto or quote?
    “Sometimes it’s the very people who no one imagines anything of who do the things no one can imagine” – Christopher Morcom – Going beyond what anyone ever expects is the hallmark of an inspirational leader

  • What are your strengths in Strength Finders?
    My top 5 strengths are: Learner, Achiever, Woo (winning others over), Positivity and Individualization … these strengths have helped inspire me in starting SPS.

  • What is your favorite food?
    If I could only have 1 ice cream for the rest of my life (and I really love ice cream!) it would be Rocky Road … doesn’t matter if it’s in a cup or cone!

Zoë Mercurio, Program Manager, Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health, Executive and Continuing Professional Education

Zoe Mercurio, Program Manager
Zoe Mercurio, Program Manager

 
Zoë is an experienced professional with extensive skills designing, administering and facilitating programs for secondary to adult education. From the classroom to the corporate setting of leadership development and more recently administering executive education programs, Zoë has always been educating. With a strong belief in the philosophy of ‘education for education’s sake’ and ‘lifelong learning’, she has strived to empower others to fulfill their potential and help them be more effective in the workplace.
 
Her career began in London, UK as an adult education teacher. She then moved on to be Head of Faculty for a Social Sciences department at the secondary school level. In this role, she was responsible for the operation of four departments which included professional development of colleagues.  Since relocating to the United States, Zoë has researched, written and published three student guides for Sociology, is a contributing author to the upcoming Teacher Observation Scale (TOS) Guide to Effective Classroom Instruction published by National Measurement and Testing and has helped design and implement an online leadership development course for Cambridge Leadership Associates (CLA). It was at her position at CLA that she worked as the Associate Director of Client Experience. Here, she helped ensure the execution of client-driven priorities and supported a consultant team to guarantee successful engagements. Currently, Zoë is administrating executive education programs at the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health where she oversees programming from conception to financial closeout.
 
Zoë is also working toward a certification in Organizational Behavior from Harvard University, holds a Sociology honors degree from the University of York, UK and possesses a PGCE (Post-Compulsory) from the Institute of Education in London, UK alongside completing her GTP at Kingston University, UK. Zoë and her husband live in Northborough, MA with their cat Elvis. In her free time, she balances her love of fine wine by practicing yoga.

Masheka Awari, Founder, That Wellness Girl

Masheka Awari, That Wellness Girl
Masheka Awari, That Wellness Girl

Leading through integrity is what drives Masheka Awari’s passions and pursuits. With justified purpose she has found her greatest honor in serving the most prolific leaders in creating efficient solutions to drive their success. Be it corporate executives, new small business entrepreneurs, or filmmaker/producers, it has become her greatest pleasure in serving in a capacity that levies great return.

  • What are you most proud of in your career?
    Being able to say “no”. I’ve learned my limitations and it has helped me to focus on opportunities that hone my skills, not drain my creativity.

  • Name one thing most people don’t know about you?

    I suffer a chronic health issue. These things really try to sap out your self-confidence. You achieve greater when you begin to live your life accepting what it is, but not letting it define you. Your mind can be your worst enemy and I’ve learned to battle it out with remaining focused on daily (even momentary) victories.

  • What is your greatest leadership trait?

    Forecasting. I believe when you take the time to sit and listen to your clients, you can literally see the end from the beginning before they launch that project. It’s as if I can smell success from a mile away. It’s taken time and I still work on it. However, I love this skill I’ve developed and I enjoy continuing to strengthen it.

  • What is your favorite project you’ve ever worked on?

    I absolutely love working on projects with campaigns with entrepreneurs and filmmakers. I’m an INFJ. Thus, doing projects for a cause puts fire in my feet! I just have to do it! When a project is mixed with my other passion, filmmaking, it’s like the creative juices mix together and the fire…something explosive happens. I become one with that thing and nothing will stop me from ensuring that leader succeeds.

  • What is the best advice you’ve been given? What is the best advice you have shared?

    Thrive where you are. Do not neglect those humble beginnings nor covet another’s success. Never ever ever think you are behind or not “there”. I enjoy hanging out with seniors. During this time, I’ve been blessed to talk to leaders in the 70+ age group who have continued to share the same mantra with me. I’ve learned to stay in my lane and enjoy the speed in which my life is providing. There is nothing wrong with life having Sunday strolls. You learn more.

Fun Fact: I named my business That Wellness Girl because community members could not remember my name. They remember me from the community health outreaches I was apart of so they would ask can “That Wellness Girl” come speak on this or help us with that. An inside joke became something that stuck. I enjoy being “nameless” because I have found my skills to do the talking.

Alena Casey, Community Engagement, Technology

Alena Casey, Community Engagement, Technology
Alena Casey, Community Engagement, Technology

Through the engagement of community, Alena Casey spends her days building strategic processes to strengthen employee engagement with community partnerships. From working with employee resource groups to local organizations, no workday is ever the same.

Before coming to the technology space, Alena worked in the Development Office at Harvard University as a part of the events team. While in this role, she was promoted to University Group Leader where she interviewed, onboarded and trained employees at Harvard.

She obtained her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, Graduate Certificate in Organizational Behavior from Harvard Extension School and is currently working towards her Master’s in Science in Industrial and Organizational Psychology at Baruch College – The City University of New York.

  • What are you most proud of in your career?
    Being a part of the Diversity & Inclusion working group at Harvard and now currently taking a role in a diversity task force in the technology space. Creating these spaces for open and honest conversations is crucial.

  • What is your greatest leadership trait?
    Adaptability and relatability to people and settings. I genuinely love people and new environments.

  • What is your favorite project you’ve ever worked on?
    Commencement at Harvard. One year with Mark Zuckerberg, the next with Congressman John Lewis.

  • What is the best advice you’ve been given? What is the best advice you have shared?
    Mentors! Finding a mentor and being a mentor – be poured into as you are pouring out into others.

  • What is your favorite part of your workday?
    The beginning of the workday: a time and space to get my thoughts and to-do lists organized for the day – typically with a nice cup of coffee.
Michael Lozano, Doctor of Education, Masters in Management
Michael Lozano, Doctor of Education, Masters in Management

Michael Lozano comes to us from Los Angeles, California where he earned his Global Executive Doctor of Education at the University of Southern California. Armed with a Master’s in Management from Harvard University, he is formally trained to achieve large-scale improvements across organizations through strategic use of policy, innovative practice, and assessments. As a professional educator, Dr. Lozano is extremely vested in creating educational change at the global level and stresses the examination of educational solutions from around the world to solve local challenges. He constantly seeks to broaden his perspectives on the challenges that organizations face and identifying root causes impeding performance.

On a personal level, Dr. Lozano is on a mission is to help every person—whether it be student, teacher, parent, or community member— to improve themselves and prepare for the next stage of their lives. He believes in elevating opportunities for all and helping the people he meets to become the thinkers, leaders, and creators of tomorrow.

Dr. Lozano also attended UC Berkeley and graduated with Highest Honors for his outstanding academic record and contribution to the research community.

About Marvin F.L. Hansen

Marvin F.L.. Hansen, Msc, PgDip, Bsc.
Marvin F.L.. Hansen, Msc, PgDip, Bsc.

A dedication to innovation shapes the direction of Marvin. He runs his consulting company and works as strategic advisor specialized in digital business transformation. Currently, he focuses on practical applications of artificial intelligence in the financial industry. In his spare time, Marvin collects Academic Degrees and dances the Argentine Tango.

He holds three degrees in computer science, holds a degree candidacy towards a master’s degree in management at Harvard Extension, holds a professional certificate in Disruptive Innovation from Harvard Business School, and got recently accepted to the 2019 Innovation Bootcamp at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  • Name one thing most people don’t know about you.
    In college, I discovered a security flaw in the university email system and so I send out a bunch of prank emails to fellow students from the Dean’s email address.

  • What is the best advice you’ve been given? What is the best advice you have shared?
    Bright minds give new answers.
    Brilliant minds ask new questions.
    Be bold and ask new question to find a new way.

  • What is your favorite leadership motto or quote?
    Only what happens eventually matters in life.

Monica Anderson Young, Munich Re IT Business Solutions Chief-of-Staff, Consultant

Monica Anderson Young</strong></a>, Munich Re IT Business Solutions Chief-of-Staff, Consultant
Monica Anderson Young, Munich Re IT Business Solutions Chief-of-Staff, Consultant

A philosophy of servant leadership has defined the career path of Monica Anderson Young. From the classroom to the boardroom, she has created and delivered impactful programs aimed at assisting and encouraging people to find their most productive, connected, educated results through a platform built on communication and compassion.

Before coming to Munich Re, Monica most recently served the Global Director of IT Employee and Community Relations for AIG, where she worked for six years. Her tenure began as the Strategic Internal Communications and Engagement leader within the Americas IT region. Fostering communication and engagement led to becoming AIG’s first Global Innovation Catalyst, connecting business and IT stakeholders with external insurtech game changers for profit-driven solutions.

Prior to AIG, Monica owned a boutique communications firm specializing in small business growth, and her writing was published in a variety of local, state, and national publications. Monica’s deep community rots and passion for volunteering resulted in recognition from a variety of organizations, included being awarded the Kay to Kernersville, North Carolina when she moved to the northeaster United States. Monica was the second person in town history to receive the honor.

She is currently working toward certification in Organizational Behavior from Harvard University and holds an executive master’s degree in Global Strategic Communication from Georgetown University where she was named to the The Hoya Professional 30, a prestigious honor, within the university. She plans to start her doctoral work in Leadership and Learning Development this fall. Monica and her husband have three daughters, a son-in-law plus another wedding planned soon, and a plethora of pets, including a hedgehog.

  • What are you most proud of in your career?
    The lasting relationships I’ve built and nurtured.

  • Name one thing most people don’t know about you.
    The Atlanta, Georgia furniture company Tritter Feefer (www.tritterfeefer.com) named a chest after me — The Monica!

  • What is your greatest leadership trait?
    I genuinely like people. I like when people are different from me. I like when they are similar. I like knowing what makes people function at their highest level and then helping create work utopia.

  • Who has been your biggest inspiration?
    Similar to many, my parents are my biggest inspiration. My mother grew up in a time and a place where women had few options other than becoming teachers, nurses, or housewives — all important roles but also limiting if one has different dreams. She wanted to be a technologist.

    She married, had children but then returned to her goals of returning to college. My dad became her biggest cheerleader. He came home from work and started doing tasks that had previously been my mom’s. He cooked for us, cleaned up, and then I would hear my dad quizzing my mom long into the nights before her exams. She graduated with the highest of honors; and collectively as a family, we celebrated. We called her “Magna cum Mama!” [127 words – this is what running long looks like]

  • What is your motto or favorite quote?
    • “Teach us to number our days,/ That we might get a heart of wisdom.” Ps. 90:12 – A thousands of years old reminder to about list prioritization and completion.
    • “Be the change that you want to see in the world.” – Mahatma Gandhi – a daily goal

    Shanon Watson

    Shannon Watson, Cross-cultural management, North America and Asia, consultant
    Shannon Watson, Cross-cultural management, North America and Asia, consultant

    Shannon Watson began her career as an operational auditor at Coca-Cola before deciding to move overseas to teach. She later returned to corporate life in finance and is currently working as a corporate consultant. Having lived for many years in both North America and Asia, she has developed a keen sensitivity to cross-cultural communications and how easily miscommunication can happen when not cognizant of the norms of an organization, a group, or a nation.

    Shannon graduated with a B.Soc.Sc. from the University of Ottawa and an International MBA from National Cheng-Chi University in Taiwan. She has also completed a certificate in Organizational Behaviour from Harvard University Extension School.

    • What is your favorite leadership motto or quote?
      “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” (Eleanor Roosevelt) This quote is a very relevant reminder in today’s society when we are exposed to an almost daily barrage of information about other people’s accomplishments. It also reminds me that we alone determine whose opinion should matter to us – and whose does not.

    • Name one thing most people don’t know about you.
      An enduring lesson in positivity and resilience was taught to me as a child by my three-legged cat Bootsy. Despite the setback of losing his leg he quickly recovered his physical strength and agility as well as his affable disposition.
  • Ashley Prisant Speaking Engagements

    Ashley Prisant Speaking Engagements

    June 5-8, 2019
    2019 Management & Organizational Behaviour Teaching Society MOBTS, Mahwah, New Jersey

    Topic: Leadership Lessons: Real-time feedback loops

    April 28-30, 2019
    2019 BMI Management Conference, Charlotte, NC
    Managing Change through Automation & Motivation – Dr. Ashley Lesko, SPHR, Square Peg Solutions

    Overview: Automation is coming to change the industry as we know it. It is up to the leaders to understand how the changes that automation will bring will impact the employees involved so that the organization, leaders and employees of the businesses can survive… and thrive.
    In this session, you will learn:

    • High level Change Management – interventions at 3 levels (changes for individuals, teams and organization
    • The impact of Change Management – How to mitigate problems caused by poor change management
    • Ideas on implementing automation in your area – with minimal impact or even appreciation by your employees
    • Motivation techniques – a look at 9 “career anchors” to help leaders understand their employees to get them to accomplish the mission
    I didn’t quit my job, I fired my company: Lessons to leaders on saving the best assets you didn’t know you had

    I didn’t quit my job, I fired my company: Lessons to leaders on saving the best assets you didn’t know you had

    A few months ago, I asked a simple question – have you ever quit a job? The responses came in fast and furious – but what was more interesting – were the reasons why people quit their jobs – and how many of them would have stayed if given the chance. In the pilot study, one of the key statistics that stuck out was….

    92% of people said they quit because of management.

    Think about it. It wasn’t the food, the benefits, the salary, or even their coworkers. The top reason that people quit was because of the management team. What’s even more scary than that? (Artwork by Rachel Christine Nowicki)

    60% said that they quit because of their immediate manager.

    Think about that for a second. Let’s say that you and 9 other people in your company have a $50,000 job. Your company is large, greater than 10,000 employees, and 10 of you quit in the year. No big deal, right? The average cost of turnover for someone in your range is about 150% – so that’s going to cost the company $750,000. If the average turnover in a company is 15% – meaning up to 1500 people would leave in a same year – well, you get the picture.

    In the pilot survey, it didn’t matter what position the individuals were in (approximately half managed others, and half were individual contributors) or how long they had been with the company (20% had quit with less than 1 years’ experience with the company, > 50%  had been with the company 2-4 years, and 25% had been there more than 5 years).

    I hear what you’re saying… I know this. I don’t want my (good) people to leave my company. What can I do about it?

    First, congrats. No, I’m not being condescending but the fact that you actually want to do something about it – from your chair, from your position right there – puts you ahead of half of the crowd. There is a lot you can do about it…. And the first step is recognizing that your employees may not feel like they NEED you as much as they used to.

    1. Participate in Career Advancement with your employees = developing Career Engagement

    Employees don’t want to be another cog on the wheel, something slightly better than a glorified robot. It doesn’t matter if it’s a manual labor construction job or a VP. More than 25% of employees said they wanted to have career engagement – an ability to engage at different levels of their career, and have both input and output about what they can do.

    One senior level manager mentioned that he had been moved several times into positions that he had “no input or choice”.  He didn’t feel in control of where he was going, and thought leaving for higher ground was better than staying and waiting for what happened next

     

    1. Listen to your employees. That’s it. Just listen.

    It’s amazing what someone will do when they know someone else is listening. When someone is paying attention to what their strengths are, where their problems are, and whether the manager really understands what they are saying.  One person said she quit because the manager had unrealistic expectations, and were not given the tools needed to succeed, despite repeated requests of the employees.  Another mentioned the regional managers couldn’t “effectively communicate company goals” and instead of listening to understand what was going on, they “blamed local managers for performance”. It can be uncomfortable to hear what your people have to say. It is even more uncomfortable to lose the person because they fired YOU, their manager.

    1. Know who you are. And know who your people are.

    This may sound a bit wishy-washy, but it’s not. Nearly 40% of those polled said that the environment and/or the culture of the firm led them to handing the shoes to their companies and saying “fill these”.

    You hire people for a job description. Accountant, buyer, sales rep. You may even have several – 20, 30 or more in each position. Each one of them are different. They have their own talents, their own strengths – and ones that are outside of their job description, but INSIDE the company’s strategic goals and values. Finding out what their strengths and talents are and using them to the company’s (and employee’s) advantage is called Talent Engagement and it is a very powerful tool that helps you as a manager and leader of your company get more out of your employees by giving them more.

    Most of the time, people do not look forward to quitting their jobs OR firing their companies…. And are looking for ways to stay.

    Understand your assets – help them stay – help everyone win.

    Why do New and Front Line Managers (NFL-M) matter?

    Why do New and Front Line Managers (NFL-M) matter?

    What’s so important about new and front line managers, anyway?  They are just a bunch of people that were promoted into positions of authority because they either a) did something right b) we needed the spot filled, and there was no one else c) got tired of their complaining. Right?

    New and Front Line Managers (NFL-M) are the heart of any organization. Big or small. Don’t believe me? Think about your company. Think about how many of them there are. And then think if they disappeared tomorrow. Yeah. Like, walked out, were all hit by a bus, fell off the planet (that last one is my personal favorite). Your middle managers and executives would walk in, ready to be strategic; ready to tell their front line folks exactly what to do (strategically) – and let those other managers take the time to figure out how the heck to get it done.  Right? But wait… there’s no one to do it.

    Could the middle managers do it? Perhaps. But it may have been a while. They may have been corporate folks that have never been out in the field. The front line employees will know in about two minutes (strike that, about 2 seconds) that these corporate managers have never seen the inside of their field office. They may have been in the field, but have forgotten. Yup, it happens.

    Being a front line manager (with direct reports that are NOT managers) or a new manager (typically also a front line manager, but with less than five years of experience) is one of THE HARDEST roles to have. Why? Because you have not one but TWO groups to please. Make happy. Check the box.  You have the managers – the senior team we just talked about… and you have the employees. Your bread and butter. The ones that you are now responsible for – their success, their development, their next career steps. If you’re lucky, you may have realized that they make you something greater than you are. If not, you may be wondering how you’re going to survive with these people that want to see you gone and/or take your job at the first opportunity.

    Some newsletters take their time in drawing you in and pushing something on you that they want you to see, want you to relate to you. This one isn’t in that group.  You’re subscribing to this newsletter because you’re in that group of managers that are the first group of managers – you see what your team is, and want to help it be everything it can be. That also means everything YOU can be as a manager. You’re not alone. In fact, you’re part of 95% of new and frontline managers that are not ready for the job (Lesko, 2015).

    In upcoming months, we’ll talk about the areas to help you improve – one month at a time, step by step. Training. Development. Timing, Feedback. Just a few.

    If you want to jumpstart this process and be a better manager now – because you know you don’t have the time to waste – good for you. Good for your employees. Email Ashley@squarepegsolutions.org  to get started. We have both a webinar and in-class session starting soon. It’s based on current research and actual stories – the best of both worlds – and it won’t suck. In fact, that’s the name of it. How Not to SUCK as a New Manager.

    So let’s get started.

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